Positive self-talk is a big plus

 

Securing healthy habits is key to physical and mental health.

Most everyone has messages that play again and again in their minds. Sadly some of those messages are not so positive. Consequently, taking time to recognize and intentionally replace negative patterns of self-talk with positive perspectives can be very beneficial for mental health.

Positive self-talk can take many different forms – it can be as simple as thanking yourself for practicing a coping skill or making a positive decision. 

An example of this might be thinking or saying, “I did a great job practicing deep breathing when I got that difficult phone call at work today,” or “I chose to eat breakfast this morning because I am devoted to improving my health.” 

Notice in these examples, there is no use of the words “can’t, won’t or shouldn’t.”  While these words can have good intent, such as “I won’t skip my workout today,” they are not actually good examples of positive self-talk and can sound quite punitive. 

Reframing the words with positive intent, such as “I am going to the gym after work today as a part of my wellness plan,” allows one to take ownership with determination, rather than as just having one more thing that can contribute to a negative head space if skipped. 

Another great way to practice positive self-talk is to come up with a short saying or specific words that resonate with you. Consider the words of a mentor, a positive quote from a movie or even a lyric from a song that gives you a boost.

Changing habits

A simple one that I often find myself using is “you got this.” I say this to myself before presentations and interviews. Sometimes all it takes is a little self-reminder that you are indeed good enough and can handle what life brings your way.

I sometimes hear clients say positive self-talk seems “too easy” to actually work. I reply with a question: “How often do you really practice it?”  It might seem easy and, at times, silly, but our words are powerful. Affirmations allow our brains to be “re-routed” toward more positive thinking and can even improve our relationships with others. 

In sum, positive self-talk is a way to take better care of one’s mental health, and we could all use being a little nicer to ourselves.

You got this.

If you need more

While considering how to improve your lifestyle, self-talk is a tremendous self-care activity, but remember elevated mental health challenges require guidance from a trained professional. For example, if you experience sadness for an extended period you may be experiencing depression and should consider talking to a professional.

At Community Reach Center, a leading Denver mental health clinic, we are always prepared to help. Visit communityreachcenter.org or call us at 303-853-3500 Monday through Friday for more information about services. We have centers in the northside Denver metro area of Adams County including the cities of Thornton, Westminster, Northglenn, Commerce City and Brighton.

This blog was written by Jenna Bogan, LPC, LAC, Program Manager of CRC’s Behavioral Health Urgent Care in Westminster. She is also a Community Reach Center featured Ask A Therapist columnist.

 

Understanding mental health apps

 

Mental health apps just keep popping up. They swim in a vast pool of other apps that cover nutrition, exercise and a mind boggling array of topics. Mental health apps continue to gain favor as self-help tools and even as a bridging device between therapy sessions.

Mental Health First Aid courses includes a self-help action step, which is “Encourage self-help and support strategies.” With this perspective, a mental health app can be an appropriate option for mild mental health concerns. However, there is little belief that apps can replace the results that come from highly specialized sessions with a therapist. When someone is experienced sustained sadness or other mental illness symptoms, an app is no substitute for therapy.

From the perspective that an app is a place to start for initial concerns, here are several well-known apps we have mentioned in previous blogs:

  • Pacifica, which tracks the user’s daily activities, providing relaxation techniques and setting goals to promote calmness.
  • Breath2Relax, which features breathing exercises for stress management. The exercises are intended to be beneficial for mind and body.
  • Happify, which targets stress and anxiety. This app encourages positive thinking and setting goals.
  • Headspace is a popular app intended to help with concentration, stress, anxiety, memorization and relationships. It focuses on overall wellness.  

Other apps catching our eye

What’s Up is a free app for iOS and Android that contains questions to pinpoint feelings and identify patterns with the goal to stop negative internal monologues that can be counterproductive. Like many apps it utilizes some basic Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) concepts.

In the category of addiction apps, Quit That!, which is free on iOS, helps users track how long they have quit specific vices. It is a straight forward way to track and monitor progress in breaking away from vices.

And for teens and young adults with anxiety, Mind Shift, free on iOS and Android, stresses the importance of how to change the way we think about anxiety. It coaches how to ride out intense emotions and face challenging situations.

Be cautious

If you are unsure about an app, especially for what it is asking you to do, be skeptical. Many apps are not backed with scientific evidence or peer-reviewed research. Groups like ClinicalTrials.gov test and assess apps, according to an article titled “Mental Health: There’s an App for That,” in Scientific American magazine. This website may have information about an app you are interested in that can save you time.

More than an app

While apps represent a way to practice self-care, remember elevated mental health challenges require guidance from a trained professional. For example, if you experience sadness for an extended period you may be experiencing depression and should consider talking to a professional. At Community Reach Center, a leading Denver mental health clinic, we are always prepared to help. Visit communityreachcenter.org or call us at 303-853-3500 Monday through Friday for more information about services. We have centers in the northside Denver metro area of Adams County including the cities of Thornton, Westminster, Northglenn, Commerce City and Brighton.

Everyone needs empathy

What is empathy? Simply put, it is the ability to put yourself in someone else’s position both intellectually and emotionally.  When we experience empathy, it provides us with the sense that we belong and are not alone. No one is immune from the need for empathy from others, as it helps us face the arduous challenges of the human experience.

Empathy is one of the qualities people need and expect from a counselor or health practitioner. It involves the open-minded response to convey compassion and understanding. Interestingly, the connecting power of empathy benefits the person who is going through difficulty, as well as the person who is listening and responding. The person who is helped by empathy can feel empowered with rekindled spirit and light, while the act of successfully helping someone else can feel similar.

To be able to honestly say “I understand” is helpful. This connection naturally occurs when we can thoughtfully convey to someone that we have “walked in their shoes” or understand their experiences. Sometimes it is difficult to understand what someone is going through. Remember that showing you care and acknowledging their discomfort is more important than conveying shared experiences.

Group activities

Therapy groups often focus on a specific symptom or issue. They are created so that people who are experiencing the same symptoms can obtain help. Support groups function in the same way. Empathy helps us realize we are not alone, ends isolation and gives members of the group a chance to provide care to others – which can be therapeutic in and of itself.

Being empathetic

Anyone can learn how to cultivate and express empathy. You can do this by becoming more sensitized to others, listening with an open mind and by practicing a mindfulness meditation known as “Loving Kindness.” It is a simple meditation where we imagine or connect with a feeling of respect, kindness and caring to one's self. One way to start this process is to think of someone or something that you care about to engender a feeling of kindness and compassion. It could be a partner, a child, a pet or anything that puts you in touch with someone or something you love.

Once you notice the change in your feelings, take a little bit of that caring back into yourself. Hold it there for a few moments. As we cultivate the feeling toward our self, the good feelings start to expand to friends, family and others. By practicing this even for a short time each day, we start to draw a sense of caring into everything and everyone around us.

Seek it out

Empathy is something of enormous value to our lives each day, if we will only take a moment to connect to it. Empathy can have a powerful impact on all our relationships. Eventually you will notice how much it is improving your life as people you care about will notice the empathy and support you offer.

Reach out

At Community Reach Center, a leading Denver mental health clinic, we understand empathy and can help anyone who feels overwhelmed to enjoy a happier, healthier life. If you are feeling sadness for an extended period of time or are concerned that you are experiencing a mental illness, learn more about our services at communityreachcenter.org or call us at 303-853-3500 Monday through Friday. We have centers in the northside Denver metro area of Adams County, including the cities of Thornton, Westminster, Northglenn, Commerce City and Brighton.

This blog was written by Michele Willingham M.A., L.P.C., L.A.C. who is a therapist for the Justice Accountability and Recovery Team at Community Reach Center. She specializes in trauma-informed care with an emphasis on the use of mindfulness skills and is an EMDR practitioner. Michele also runs a wellness group that utilizes walking, Tai Chi exercise and yoga to help improve symptoms.