Consider social exercise to improve mental health

Mental health issues are increasing on a global scale, especially in teenagers. It is estimated 25 percent of teens experience anxiety and at least 20 percent experience depression before adulthood. In response, researchers are focusing on finding activities and lifestyles to promote mental health. From their research, they have discovered those who participate in team sports or social exercise have lower anxiety levels and experience less depression than those who participate in individual sports or no sports at all.

Why are team sports effective?

It is well-known that exercise is beneficial for mental and physical wellness, but why are team sports more helpful for reducing mental health issues than other forms of exercise?

The following factors contribute to the positive state of mental health found in team sports participants:

  • Socialization
  • Social status
  • Social support and accountability

These social elements found in team sports are beneficial for combating symptoms of depression. For instance, social isolation is a common symptom of depression eliminated through the social elements ingrained in team sports.

Team sports or social exercise?

When most people think of team sports, they usually think of sports like football, basketball, baseball or soccer. However, these sports are not suited for everyone seeking social exercise.  Here are some examples of exercise activities that can be engaged in socially:

  • Running or cycling
  • Hiking
  • Group fitness classes (i.e. yoga, martial arts, kickboxing, cycling, etc.)

Countless activities and forms of exercise can be engaged in socially. Essentially, if an exercise activity includes the fundamental social elements of team sports, it will provide similar benefits to mental health.

What if I play individual sports?

If you are an individual sport athlete, don't sweat it. Any form of exercise has mental health benefits, although may not be as extensive as social exercises. Nevertheless, if you are interested in obtaining the mental health benefits associated with social exercise, consider finding a balance between individual and social exercise.

Positive self-talk

Research has shown that positive self-talk can improve mental health, as well as performance in sports. This is because positive-self talk decreases performance anxiety and increases an athlete's confidence in their abilities. Although – whether you play sports or not – positive self-talk is a great practice to consider due to its mental health benefits. To develop a habit of practicing positive self-talk, take the following steps:

  • Choose a positive affirmation or motivational phrase to repeat, such as “You got this” or “I can do this.”
  • Once repeating this phrase becomes a habit, create more phrases that apply to specific areas of life.
  • Once you’ve created multiple phrases, attach positive mental images to them for effective visualization.

Something to consider

Keep in mind that athletes experience mental health issues too, regardless of the sports they play. Additionally, exercise alone is not sufficient treatment for serious mental disorders. In that regard, people struggling with their mental health should seek professional help.

Finding ways to cope with mental health issues can be challenging. If you or a loved one has a mental health concern, we are happy to consult with you at Community Reach Center. To get more information about our metro Denver mental health centers visit communityreachcenter.org or call 303-853-3500. We have centers in the northside Denver metro area including the cities of Thornton, Westminster, Northglenn, Commerce City, Broomfield and Brighton.

This blog was contributed by Brice Pernicka, a Westgate Community School student who is also an intern at Community Reach Center.

Take heart for mental health

 

February is American Heart Month. Although the relationship between good mental health and heart health is certainly complex, it is a proven fact that good blood flow from the heart to the brain is important for overall wellness.

Certainly, when someone has a heart attack, heart surgery or stroke, the immediate concern is physical health. At the same time, research has shown cardiovascular disease can trigger depression and the need for counseling and medication.

With these thoughts in mind, consider lifestyle changes and good habits to maintain a healthy heart.

Here are a few tips

Let’s talk about the American Heart Association’s seven risk factors as areas for improvement to live longer and healthier lives:

  • Manage your blood pressure: When you keep your blood pressure within healthier ranges you reduce stress on your heart. There are five blood pressure ranges to consider that clearly indicate a normal blood pressure or one of the elevated levels. Find out your blood pressure and consider if you need to make changes.
  • Control cholesterol: High cholesterol can clog arteries and lead to heart disease and stroke. In short, reducing saturated fats and trans fats helps and focusing on foods rich in Omega-3 fatty acids and soluble fiber can help. Consider your eating habits and what may need to change.
  • Reduce blood sugar: High levels of blood sugar damage the heart, kidneys, eyes and nerves. Drink plenty of water and cut down on carb intake. Seek a low carb diet to reduce blood sugar.
  • Get active: Physical activity improves the length and the quality of life. Sometimes finding ways to enjoy exercise with others increases success. Good goals include 20 to 30 minutes a day or three times a week.
  • Eat better: A healthful diet is one of the best ways to fight heart disease. Among the many books on healthful eating is the “Mayo Clinic Diet: Eat well. Enjoy life, Lose weight.” It’s a playbook for solidifying healthful eating habits, and it is well researched.
  • Lose weight: Losing weight takes stress off your heart. Find tried and true methods, such as the Mayo Clinic book, which focuses on changing lifestyle habits to lose weight for the long term.
  • Stop smoking: Smoking increases likelihood of having heart disease. The warnings about the dangers of smoking are well known. Smoking generally increases the risk for coronary heart disease by two to four times, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, known as the CDC. Similarly, consider the dangers of nicotine in vaping.

For starters, take some steps

So maybe the best advice for American Heart Month is to take a walk. While you are on your walk think about the seven risk factors and where your best opportunities for improvement may exist.

It could be learning to live with lightly salted foods or gulping the recommended eight 8-ounce glasses of water per day. Or maybe it amounts to choosing new types of exercise and gearing up the gym bag.

It’s always a good time find opportunities to improve your health.    

Learn more

While our expertise is in mental health, we are happy to advocate for the importance of American Heart Month. Just as many physical health challenges can be healed, mental illnesses are often treatable, so please don’t hesitate to seek assistance. Remember the Behavioral Health Urgent Care (BHUC) center, 2551 W. 84th Ave., in Westminster is open 24 hours. And to learn more about Community Reach Center, a nonprofit mental health center with numerous outpatient offices in north metro Denver, visit www.communityreachcenter.org or call 303-853-3500. If you have any questions about where to turn for help for older adults, please call the Senior Reach team at Community Reach Center at 303-853-3657. Community Reach Center provides comprehensive behavioral health services for all ages at locations in Thornton, Westminster, Northglenn, Commerce City, Brighton and Broomfield. As always, we are here to enhance the health of our community. Mental wellness for everyone is our goal.

Understanding the realities of mental health challenges

“I just haven’t felt like myself lately.”

We all hear this phrase – or something similar – now and then.

Such candid sharing means that the person trusts you and feels comfortable telling you how they feel rather than bottling it up. Intimate sharing like this illustrates healthful, supportive relationships that are enriched by compassionate listening. Are you one of those compassionate listeners?  Imagine how much more helpful you could be if you knew more about mental health challenges, treatment options and resources available right in your community.  

The face of mental illness

Everyone has a bad day now and then.  When symptoms are intense and present for longer than two weeks, a string of bad days may actually be an emerging mental health concern.

Here is what to watch for:

  • Is the person’s symptoms disrupting their work, ability to carry out daily activities or engage in satisfying relationships?
  • Is it affecting their thinking, emotional state or behavior?

When symptoms are causing a persistent disruption in someone’s life for two weeks or longer, it may be time to extend your compassionate support and help connect the person with professional help. Keep in mind that a mental disorder or mental illness is a diagnosable illness sometimes caused by trauma, chemical imbalances in the brain and other biological and environmental factors. A little professional help can go a long way.

The landscape of mental health

While Colorado is a phenomenal destination state that offers ample winter sporting venues and endless options for entertainment and social engagements, the state has its mental health pitfalls.

Consider that:

  • Colorado ranks 16th in the incidence of mental illness. A total of 20.6 percent of Coloradans experienced some form of mental illness last year (approximately 750,000 Colorado adults).
  • Colorado currently has the 10th highest suicide rate in the nation. About 13 people of every 100,000 in the United States died due to suicide in 2016. That same year, Colorado lost more than 20 people per 100,000 residents.
  • Suicide is leading cause of death among young Coloradans age 10 to 24.
  • Major depressive disorder is the leading cause of disability in the U.S. for ages 15 to 44.
  • About 1 in 4 adults and 1 in 10 young people experience a mental disorder each year; less than 50 percent receive treatment.

Learn the basics

Equipped with the right information, it’s easier to help others or yourself.  For example, did you know that anxiety disorder is the most commonly diagnosed mental health challenge in the U.S.?  Symptoms associated with anxiety disorder are broader than just feeling “on edge,” and can include headaches, muscle aches, chest pain and a huge variety of other physical ailments. Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a specific form of anxiety, hallmarked by nightmares, emotional flatness, depression, anger, irritability or a tendency to be easily startled.

Be in the know

A free presentation titled “Understanding the Realities of Mental Illness,” will be offered 3:30 to 5 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 27, at Community Reach Center, 11285 Highline Drive in Northglenn. The presentation will cover signs and symptoms of a variety of mental illnesses, treatment options and helpful local resources. Ample time will be provided for questions as well. Please visit www.communityreachcenter.org to register.

It is vitally important for people experiencing mental health conditions and their loved ones to know mental illness is treatable. Please don’t hesitate to seek assistance. Remember the Behavioral Health Urgent Care (BHUC) center, 2551 W. 84th Ave., in Westminster is open 24 hours. And to learn more about Community Reach Center, a nonprofit mental health center with numerous outpatient offices in north metro Denver, visit www.communityreachcenter.org or call 303-853-3500. If you have any questions about where to turn for help for older adults, please call the Senior Reach team at Community Reach Center at 303-853-3657. Community Reach Center provides comprehensive behavioral health services for all ages at locations in Thornton, Westminster, Northglenn, Commerce City, Brighton and Broomfield. As always, we are here to enhance the health of our community. Mental wellness for everyone is our goal.

Encouraging wellness in older adults

We all know exercise and physical activity is extremely important, and we know exercise has proven benefits for older people. It reduces risk of cardiovascular disease, hypertension, Type 2 diabetes, osteoporosis, obesity, colon cancer and breast cancer. It also decreases the risk of falls and fall-related injuries. 

Like everyone else, older people may know that exercise is good for their health, but they may not have the motivation or encouragement to do it. One way you can help is to guide those around you by asking about their daily activities and whether they engage in any kind of regular exercise or physical activity. 

There are several ways to encourage older adults to exercise:

  • Let them know that regular physical activity – including endurance, muscle-strengthening, balance, and flexibility exercises – is essential for healthy aging.
  • Help them set realistic goals and develop an exercise plan. 
  • Work together to write an exercise outline, and make it specific, including type, frequency, intensity, and time; follow up to check progress and re-evaluate goals over time.
  • Refer to opportunities in community resource listings, such as mall-walking groups and senior center fitness classes.

Nutrition

Older adults may develop poor eating habits for many reasons. These can range from a decreased sense of smell and taste to teeth problems or depression. Older adults may also have difficulty making their way to a supermarket or simply standing long enough to cook a meal. And, although energy needs may decrease with age, the need for certain vitamins and minerals, including calcium, vitamin D, and vitamins B6 and B12, increases after age 50.

Try these strategies to encourage healthy diets:

  • Emphasize that good nutrition can have an impact on well-being and independence.
  • If needed, suggest they seek information about liquid nutrition supplements, but emphasize the benefits of solid foods.
  • If needed, suggest multivitamins that fulfill 100 percent of the recommended daily amounts of vitamins and minerals for older people, but steer clear of mega doses.
  • Encourage the older adult to have conversations with their primary care providers.

 

Too old to exercise? Studies say no!

Consider these facts:

  • Together, exercise and lifestyle changes, such as becoming more active and eating healthy food, reduce the risk of diabetes in high-risk older people. In one study, lifestyle changes led to a 71 percent decrease in diabetes among people 60 and older.
  • In another study, moderate exercise was effective at reducing stress and sleep problems in older women caring for a family member with dementia. 
  • Older people who exercise moderately can fall asleep quickly, sleep for longer periods and have better quality of sleep.
  • Researchers also found that exercise can improve balance and reduce falls among older people by 33 percent.
  • Walking and strength-building exercises by people with knee osteoarthritis help reduce pain and maintain function and quality of life.

Sometimes it’s hard to get moving, but oftentimes when a person gets up and around, he or she suddenly feels gratified and inspired. Let’s rally for that outcome with all older adults.

We would like to thank Wellness and Care Coordinator Nicole Hartog and Program Manager James Kuemmerle with the Senior Reach program at Community Reach Center for their insights. During this time, and all year long, it is important for people experiencing mental health conditions and their loved ones to know that mental illness is treatable, and there is no shame in seeking assistance. Remember the Behavioral Health Urgent Care (BHUC) center, 2551 W. 84th Ave., in Westminster is open 24 hours. And to learn more about Community Reach Center, a nonprofit mental health center with numerous outpatient offices in north metro Denver, visit www.communityreachcenter.org or call 303-853-3500. If you have any questions about where to turn for help for older adults, please reach out to the Senior Reach team at Community Reach Center at 303-853-3657. We provide treatment for depression and trauma, as well as many other mental disorders. Community Reach Center provides comprehensive behavioral health services for all ages at locations in Thornton, Westminster, Northglenn, Commerce City, Brighton and Broomfield.

Dangers of teen drug use

Many teens experiment with various substances to experience mental and physical effects. Some will experiment with peers in moderation with little significant long-term impact while others will develop a Substance Use Disorder (SUD).

A SUD is defined as a disease that affects a person’s brain and behavior, characterized by the inability to control use and is detrimental to meeting daily responsibilities and activities you obligated yourself to participate in.

The three most common substances used by teenagers are alcohol, nicotine and marijuana, and their use can sometimes lead to developing SUD.

Alcohol

Alcohol is the most abused substance by adolescents.

Many young people do not perceive alcohol as a dangerous substance due to its widespread use among adults and peers, and from appealing marketing seen on television, internet ads and billboards.

Although alcohol use is prevalent among teenagers, underage drinking can have significant consequences to daily life such as:

  • Decreased school performance and attendance
  • Lack of participation in daily activities and responsibilities
  • Increased risk for legal problems and engagement in risky behavior

Using alcohol heavily during adolescence may also cause cognitive impairments and physical damage to the brain. 

Adolescent alcohol use is also linked to an increased risk of developing alcohol use disorder later in life, which should be considered by adolescents when deciding whether to drink.

Nicotine (e-cigarettes)

Tobacco products have always been highly-abused by teenagers due to the addictive chemical nicotine. However, the number of teen smokers has significantly decreased in recent years due to the rise of e-cigarettes.

The following factors contribute to e-cigarette abuse among teens:

  • Cheaper than traditional tobacco products
  • High amounts of nicotine can be provided
  • Flavors that are preferable to tobacco can be used
  • Minimal odor during use
  • Easily concealed and used

Many teenagers do not realize that vaping nicotine in e-cigarettes is harmful. Actually, use during adolescence can impact parts of the brain that control attention, learning, mood and impulse control. Teenagers should consider these factors when deciding to use nicotine from an e-cigarette or other tobacco products.

Marijuana

Marijuana has been used by teenagers for decades, although the following factors contribute to high use among modern teenagers:

  • Easily accessible in states that have legalized marijuana
  • Glorification in many genres of music and by influential people
  • Peer pressure and social influence

The legalization of marijuana for medicinal purposes led to many young people perceiving it as harmless. While this is a common misconception, adolescent marijuana use can cause impairments in the following areas of mental and physical functioning:

  • Memory
  • Concentration
  • Attention
  • Decision making
  • Physical coordination

Like other drugs, it is important to remember marijuana can be abused and is harmful to brain development during adolescence.

Risk Factors

Risk factors for developing SUD include using drugs to cope with stress, anxiety, depression or other mental health problems. Genetic factors can be traced to family members that have a history with these disorders.

Also, about 82 percent of adolescents with substance use disorder have a mental health challenge, according to "Mental Health First Aid USA: For Adults Assisting Young People."

General information and finding help

Drug use of any type during development of the prefrontal cortex, which commonly extends to age 25, can have significant long-term consequences on cognitive functioning and abilities.

To find information on helping an adolescent who is suffering from drug addiction and finding proper treatment methods, visit these articles:

https://www.verywellmind.com/how-to-help-addicts-22238

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/323468.php#self-help-groups

Finding additional help

Finding ways to cope with mental health issues can be challenging. If you have you or a loved one is experiencing drug dependence, we are glad to consult with you at Community Reach Center. We have centers in the northside Denver metro area including the cities of Thornton, Westminster, Northglenn, Commerce City, and Brighton. Remember that our Behavioral Health Urgent Care (BHUC) center, 2551 W. 84th Ave., in Westminster is open 24 hours. To learn more about Community Reach Center, a nonprofit mental health center with numerous outpatient offices in Adams County, visit www.communityreachcenter.org or call 303-853-3500.

This blog was contributed by Brice Pernicka, a Westgate Community School student who is also an intern at Community Reach Center.

Identifying warning signs for suicide

A person who may be thinking about suicide likely does not want to die but is in search of some way to make pain or suffering go away. Older people who attempt suicide are often more isolated, more likely to have a plan, and more determined than younger adults. Suicide attempts are more likely to end in death for older adults than younger adults, especially when attempted by men. But suicide is 100 percent preventable.

Use the checklist to determine if you or someone you know may be showing warning signs of suicidal thoughts.

Risk factors and warning signs

Suicidal thoughts in older adults may be linked to several important risk factors and warning signs. These include, among others:

  • Depression
  • Prior suicide attempts
  • Marked feelings of hopelessness; lack of interest in the future
  • Feelings of loss of independence or sense of purpose
  • Medical conditions that significantly limit functioning or life expectancy
  • Impulsivity due to cognitive impairment
  • Social isolation
  • Family discord or losses (i.e. recent death of a loved one)
  • Inflexible personality or marked difficulty adapting to change
  • Access to lethal means (i.e. firearms, other weapons, etc)
  • Daring or risk-taking behavior
  • Sudden personality changes
  • Alcohol or medication misuse or abuse
  • Verbal suicide threats such as, “You’d be better off without me” or “Maybe I won’t be around.”
  • Giving away prized possessions

Preventing suicide

It is crucial that friends and family of older adults identify signs of suicidal thoughts and take appropriate follow-up actions to prevent them from acting on these thoughts. Suicidal thoughts are often a symptom of depression and should always be taken seriously.

Passive suicidal thoughts include thoughts of being “better off dead.” They are not necessarily associated with increased risk for suicide but are a sign of significant distress and should be addressed immediately.

In contrast, active suicidal thoughts include thoughts of acting toward hurting or killing oneself. An example of an active suicidal thought would be answering yes to the question: In the last two weeks, have you had any thoughts of hurting or killing yourself? These thoughts require immediate clinical assessment and intervention by a mental health professional.

If someone you know has a suicide plan with intent to act, you should not leave them alone – make sure to stay with them until emergency services are in place.

Key takeaway

If you or someone you know is experiencing passive or active suicidal thoughts, or has described a plan with intent to act, it is essential that you intervene and get help from a mental health professional immediately. A timely and appropriate intervention can prevent suicide and addressing issues sooner rather than later often results in better treatment outcomes.

 We would like to thank Wellness and Care Coordinator Nicole Hartog and Program Manager James Kuemmerle with the Senior Reach program at Community Reach Center for these insights during Suicide Prevention Awareness Month. During this month, and all year long, it is important for people suffering from mental health conditions and their loved ones to know that mental illness is treatable, and there is no shame in seeking assistance.

Remember that our Behavioral Health Urgent Care (BHUC) center, 2551 W. 84th Ave., in Westminster is open 24 hours. And to learn more about Community Reach Center, a nonprofit mental health center with numerous outpatient offices in Adams County, visit www.communityreachcenter.org or call 303-853-3500. If you have any questions about where to turn for help for older adults, please reach out to the Senior Reach team at Community Reach Center at 303-853-3657. Community Reach Center provides leading Denver mental health centers to visit. We have centers in the northside Denver metro area of Adams County, including the cities of Thornton, Westminster, Northglenn, Commerce City and Brighton.

Everyone needs empathy

What is empathy? Simply put, it is the ability to put yourself in someone else’s position both intellectually and emotionally.  When we experience empathy, it provides us with the sense that we belong and are not alone. No one is immune from the need for empathy from others, as it helps us face the arduous challenges of the human experience.

Empathy is one of the qualities people need and expect from a counselor or health practitioner. It involves the open-minded response to convey compassion and understanding. Interestingly, the connecting power of empathy benefits the person who is going through difficulty, as well as the person who is listening and responding. The person who is helped by empathy can feel empowered with rekindled spirit and light, while the act of successfully helping someone else can feel similar.

To be able to honestly say “I understand” is helpful. This connection naturally occurs when we can thoughtfully convey to someone that we have “walked in their shoes” or understand their experiences. Sometimes it is difficult to understand what someone is going through. Remember that showing you care and acknowledging their discomfort is more important than conveying shared experiences.

Group activities

Therapy groups often focus on a specific symptom or issue. They are created so that people who are experiencing the same symptoms can obtain help. Support groups function in the same way. Empathy helps us realize we are not alone, ends isolation and gives members of the group a chance to provide care to others – which can be therapeutic in and of itself.

Being empathetic

Anyone can learn how to cultivate and express empathy. You can do this by becoming more sensitized to others, listening with an open mind and by practicing a mindfulness meditation known as “Loving Kindness.” It is a simple meditation where we imagine or connect with a feeling of respect, kindness and caring to one's self. One way to start this process is to think of someone or something that you care about to engender a feeling of kindness and compassion. It could be a partner, a child, a pet or anything that puts you in touch with someone or something you love.

Once you notice the change in your feelings, take a little bit of that caring back into yourself. Hold it there for a few moments. As we cultivate the feeling toward our self, the good feelings start to expand to friends, family and others. By practicing this even for a short time each day, we start to draw a sense of caring into everything and everyone around us.

Seek it out

Empathy is something of enormous value to our lives each day, if we will only take a moment to connect to it. Empathy can have a powerful impact on all our relationships. Eventually you will notice how much it is improving your life as people you care about will notice the empathy and support you offer.

Reach out

At Community Reach Center, a leading Denver mental health clinic, we understand empathy and can help anyone who feels overwhelmed to enjoy a happier, healthier life. If you are feeling sadness for an extended period of time or are concerned that you are experiencing a mental illness, learn more about our services at communityreachcenter.org or call us at 303-853-3500 Monday through Friday. We have centers in the northside Denver metro area of Adams County, including the cities of Thornton, Westminster, Northglenn, Commerce City and Brighton.

This blog was written by Michele Willingham M.A., L.P.C., L.A.C. who is a therapist for the Justice Accountability and Recovery Team at Community Reach Center. She specializes in trauma-informed care with an emphasis on the use of mindfulness skills and is an EMDR practitioner. Michele also runs a wellness group that utilizes walking, Tai Chi exercise and yoga to help improve symptoms.

 

Why people don’t seek treatment for depression

What prevents people from taking steps to obtain treatment for depression?

Sometimes the needed services are simply not available, so there is nowhere to turn. Even with available options, there are numerous other factors that prevent people from obtaining help – either to take the first step to meet with a practitioner or to pursue treatment once diagnosed.

An average of one in four Americans experience a mental illness every year, yet only about 41 percent seek mental health services.  In fact, the median time frame for seeking treatment is 10 years.

Some of the most common reasons people do not take the steps needed to obtain help for depression include:

  • Fear and shame: People recognize the negative stigma and discrimination of being associated with a mental illness. Fear of being labeled weak is part of the human condition, and it is natural to worry about impact on education, careers and life goals.
  • Lack of insight: When someone has clear signs of a mental illness but is convinced nothing is wrong, this is known as anosognosia.
  • Limited awareness: A person sometimes minimizes their issues and rationalizes that what is going on is “not that bad” or “everyone gets stressed.” Learning more about symptoms and conditions is advised for everyone wanting to better understand depression.
  • Feelings of inadequacy: Many people believe that they are inadequate or it would mean failure to admit that something is wrong. They believe they should be able to handle it.
  • Distrust: Some find it difficult to share personal details with a counselor, and may worry that information will not be kept confidential
  • Hopelessness: Sometimes there is a feeling that nothing will ever get better and nothing will help.
  • Unavailability: Some may not know how to find help, and in underserved areas this problem is more significant.
  • Practical barriers: A lack of reliable transportation or the ability to pay for services or appointments times that conflict with work or school schedules are significant.

Communications and programs are continuously working to make mental health treatments as accessible as possible. The continuing integration of primary care and mental health services is meant to streamline the processes involved in getting people to the help that they need. Visit the Colorado Behavioral Healthcare Council for nearby mental health centers, and for immediate concerns please call the Colorado Crisis Services at 1-844-493-TALK (8255).

The challenge is clear. A study in the Journal of General Internal Medicine indicates that of those who are newly diagnosed, only about a third get treatment, and the statistic is even lower among minorities and older adults. Consequently, it is important to educate yourself about mental health providers nearest you.

We have a broad and diverse continuum of mental health services at Community Reach Center. To learn more about our services, visit communityreachcenter.org or call us at 303-853-3500 Monday through Friday. We have outpatient and residential centers in the north side Denver metro area, including Thornton, Westminster, Northglenn, Commerce City and Brighton.

Learn About Family Counseling as National Drug and Alcohol Facts Week Approaches

Father hugging sonNational Drug and Alcohol Facts Week  is Jan. 22-27. This important observance is designed to give teens and their families helpful, accurate information on drug and alcohol use. Too often a teen’s attitude toward substance abuse is shaped by influences in movies, TV shows, music and video games that don’t accurately depict the toll that substance use can take on them, their friends and families.  

A wide variety of events and the distribution of science-based materials aims to bust the many myths about drug and alcohol use during National Drug and Alcohol Facts Week. Many parents find that the observance can create positive momentum toward intervening in a teen’s substance abuse through treatments like family counseling.

 

7 Tips for Talking With Teens About Drugs and Alcohol

At the core of National Drug and Alcohol Facts Week is the idea that teens who have accurate information about substance abuse and open lines of communication with their parents and other adults are empowered to make smart choices about their behavior. To make that vision a reality, parents must initiate a dialog with their adolescent children.

Below are seven key concepts to keep in mind as you take that first step:

1) Give your teen ample notice. Conversations about drug and alcohol use can be difficult. If a teen is caught off guard, a common reaction is to become defensive and uncommunicative. On the other hand, a teen who has some time to gather their thoughts is much more likely to be open and engaged in the conversation. 

2) Start talking with your children when they are young. Many children have their first experience with drugs or alcohol earlier than parents might think — before they are even teenagers in some cases. Ideally, you should open a dialog before they begin experimenting.

3) Don’t make accusations or demand information. Unless you know for certain that your teen is using drugs or alcohol, you should not accuse them of doing so. You also should not demand that they disclose information about their behavior or that of their peers. The goal of this conversation is to encourage openness going forward and to indicate your willingness to be a resource for your teen.

4) Avoid scare tactics. While there are many serious consequences of drug or alcohol abuse, you should not attempt to shock your teen into abstinence. Doing so may make them hesitant to have conversations with you in the future. 

5) Set expectations and discuss consequences. Be sure your teen is clear on your rules regarding substance abuse and what the consequences are for breaking those rules. Then, be sure to follow through if the need arises.

6) Give your teen a safe way out of difficult situations. Let your teen know that they can call or text you at any time of the day or night and you will come to get them, no questions asked. 

7) Consider professional help. If you think opening a dialog with your teen will be too difficult, it may be helpful to have a therapist participate in the conversation.

 

Helping Teens and Families Find Common Ground Through Family Counseling 

Community Reach Center provides a wide variety of mental and emotional health services to help teens and families come to an agreement on issues around drug and alcohol use. This includes individual counseling, family counseling and other treatments. To learn more, visit communityreachcenter.org or call us at 303-853-3500 Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. We have centers in the northside Denver metro area of Adams County including the cities of Thornton, Westminster, Northglenn, Commerce City and Brighton.

9 Tips for Enjoying Stress-Free Holidays

Woman deep in thought

The holidays can be a wonderful time of joy and celebration with family and friends. However, they can also be a source of anxiety and stress. Fortunately, steps can be taken to make the holidays less stressful and more enjoyable. As a provider of mental health services, we encourage our consumers to be proactive and to celebrate in the ways that work best for them.

 

Festivities That Fit Your Lifestyle

Too often the holidays are focused on pleasing others in everything from the way we decorate to the gifts we give. That feeling of being “out of control” is one of the main reasons that the holidays can be stressful. Use the nine tips below to make the season more fun and festive.

  1. Make decisions early. Should I serve ham or turkey? White lights or colored lights outside? Real tree or artificial tree? There are no right or wrong answers to these kinds of questions. Rather than pondering them endlessly, give them brief consideration, make a decision and move on.
  2. Set a gift budget and stick to it. Financial stress is an unfortunate aspect of the holidays for many people, especially when they spend more than they had intended. Set a reasonable budget for gift purchases, write it down and stick to it.
  3. Consider a break from tradition. Enjoying the holidays in the same way each year can be a source of comfort, but it can also start to feel restrictive. Don’t hesitate to break from certain traditions if doing so will lower your stress level.
  4. Take care of your mind and body. In the last few months of the year, it’s easy for all the activities and obligations to push the things you do to maintain your mental and physical health to the back burner. Don’t let that happen. Eat well, get plenty of rest, exercise regularly, pray or meditate and in general make an effort to be good to yourself.
  5. Learn to say “No.” The demands on your time during the holidays can be overwhelming. Make a list of all the activities you could participate in and then scratch items off the list until you have a reasonable agenda. It may be hard to do, but it is well worth the effort.
  6. Overcome perfectionist tendencies. Trying too hard to make everything about the holidays “perfect” is a major source of stress. Remind yourself frequently that letting go of perfectionism lets you get a better hold on happiness!
  7. Ask for help. As they say, “Many hands make light work.” Get other family members involved in decorating, cooking and cleaning. They may groan at first, but they will likely find that shared tasks bring a sense of camaraderie that makes the holidays more fun.
  8. Go tech-free now and then. Especially during holiday meals and events, put your smartphone away and ask that others do the same. The constant distraction of alerts and updates can keep your body and mind in a perpetual “fight or flight” state that can be exhausting.
  9. Focus on gratitude. If the holidays have been stressful for you in the past, it’s easy to have expectations that the same will be true this year. Rather than thinking about the negative aspects of prior holidays, keep redirecting your mind to the things you are grateful for. It can be difficult to break free from pessimistic thought patterns, but if you are persistent, you can do it!

 

Social Anxiety Disorders and the Holidays

The holidays can be especially stressful for people who have a social anxiety disorder. Using the tips above can be helpful, but consider professional mental health services for you or a loved one. A skilled counselor can talk about specific situations and help to develop strategies for navigating the unique challenges of this time of year.

Fill out our contact form or call us at 303-853-3500 Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. for more information about our counseling services. We have centers in the northside Denver metro area of Adams County including the cities of Thornton, Westminster, Northglenn, Commerce City and Brighton.